Tag: burnout

“You Can Do This Hard Thing”: The Odd Road to Tougher

A firefighter told me yesterday that when he started working with me on his resilience he was excited because he thought that he was going to come out of it tougher, stronger, better able to just push through the hard things. “And I was wrong about that,” he said.  “I’m softer now than I think I’ve been since I was a kid.  And I’m happier, and I do my job better, and I think I’ll be able to do it for longer.  But you didn’t make me tougher.”  Except that I did.  This is the paradox of resilience and vulnerability.  That from

Resilience Myth #3: The Awesome Work Ethic

In the last post, we looked at the resilience Myth #2:  “I'll evade burnout with careful time management.” So stop and think for a moment about what an amazing (and sustainable) weekly* calendar would look like when you opened it in the morning.  For me?  Here are a few key indicators of a damn good life that can stay that way: There is space around the things on it. -- What does a spacious life look and feel like?  (pretty awesome, really.) Many time blocks are big. -- There is time to dive deep in between the getting in and climbing out. There are multiple sections in purple

Staying Resilient in 2015: The Biggest Myths — Myth #2

In the last post we looked at Myth #1: “I just need to work out a more balanced life.” To give you one more idea around this one, Robert Grudin, who is one of my favorite thinkers, wrote in his book on time, "On this subject it is striking to note how many individuals pursue, outside of their own professions and with a kind of rebellious delight, hobbies that are no more than personalized forms of work.  This suggests that one of the hidden desires of humanity, provoked by the inward clamor of unused potentialities, is the dream of work in freedom..." So

Averting Burnout This Year: The 4 Biggest Myths — #1

For a time, I crashed down into a full-on burnout once every ten years: three times in three ways -- once through tragedy, once as a student pushing too hard, and once as a leader and a professional without useful boundaries.  Each time I put in my time as the empty pitcher -- trying and wanting to pour out as designed but with nothing left inside to give, and without good systems in place to refill me.  Now I've got a really good eye for this kind of thing -- seeing whose strategies are good for the long haul and whose are full of holes.  And

Burnout is an open door.

Sometimes I feel I must be an alien, because I really, really love to talk about death, and about burnout. But this is really why. When I start from death, and burnout, we skip over the trite, and the hiding places, and the escape hatches, and go deep into the real. And then I can speak into survival, vulnerability, leadership, and of recovery and resilience into a listening of reawakening, because over and over, if we do it right, the deepest parts of ourselves become our new skin. Tomorrow, at the Bozeman Public Library at noon I'll be talking